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Verschiedene Strategien der Objektkategorisierung: Evidenz durch funktionelle Gehirnasymmetrien

Verschiedene Strategien der Objektkategorisierung: Evidenz durch funktionelle Gehirnasymmetrien

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STUDER, Tobias, 2008. Verschiedene Strategien der Objektkategorisierung: Evidenz durch funktionelle Gehirnasymmetrien [Dissertation]. Konstanz: University of Konstanz

@phdthesis{Studer2008Versc-10830, title={Verschiedene Strategien der Objektkategorisierung: Evidenz durch funktionelle Gehirnasymmetrien}, year={2008}, author={Studer, Tobias}, address={Konstanz}, school={Universität Konstanz} }

Verschiedene Strategien der Objektkategorisierung: Evidenz durch funktionelle Gehirnasymmetrien 2008 Studer, Tobias Multiple strategies of object categorization: Evidence from functional hemispheric asymmetries 2011-03-25T09:23:01Z Objects can be categorized at a basic level (e.g. dog ) as well as at a subordinate level of categorization (e.g. Dalmatian ). Research on categorization as well as on object perception claim functional hemispheric asymmetries for this task, each, however, in different direction: Categorization research assumes an advantage of the left hemisphere (LH) for categorizations at the basic level and an advantage of the right hemisphere (RH) for those at the subordinate level (representation hypothesis; e.g. Laeng & al., 2003). Research on object perception suggests a pattern which is opposite (feature hypothesis; e.g. Hübner & Studer, in press; Large & McMullen, 2006). There is evidence, however, for both accounts. Therefore, the aim of the present studies was to solve these contradictory results and to further analyze the specific mechanisms that underlie the categorization at the basic and the subordinate level.<br />One reason for these contradictions might be that the representation and the feature hypothesis have been investigated with different kinds of experimental paradigms on the one hand with matching tasks, on the other hand with identification tasks. It was shown in Study I that the specific task indeed determines whether the observed hemispheric differences are as predicted by the one or the other hypothesis. This finding implies that different categorization strategies have been used in the two tasks.<br />The aim of Study II was to further analyze the specific properties of categorization tasks and to investigate in which way these properties influence the pattern of hemispheric asymmetries that can be observed. First, it could be shown that in a naming task both patterns of brain asymmetries can be found with equal probability (Experiment 1). However, a certain pattern of hemispheric asymmetries can be induced by manipulations of the task context: Raising the number of categories (Experiment 2) as well as changing the task from matching to naming (Experiment 3) lead both to hemispheric asymmetries as predicted by the feature hypothesis.<br />Thus, the experiments show that the specific pattern of hemispheric asymmetries for categorizing objects at the basic and the subordinate level depends heavily on the specific task. Further, the results in general support theories that postulate multiple strategies of categorization (e.g. Smith & Allen, 1998). deu application/pdf 2011-03-25T09:23:01Z deposit-license Studer, Tobias

Dateiabrufe seit 01.10.2014 (Informationen über die Zugriffsstatistik)

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