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The Interface of Volunteer Work and Paid Work : Benefits of Volunteering for Working Life

The Interface of Volunteer Work and Paid Work : Benefits of Volunteering for Working Life

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Prüfsumme: MD5:130311ce3377d8c91b056789ffce1932

MOJZA, Eva J., 2008. The Interface of Volunteer Work and Paid Work : Benefits of Volunteering for Working Life [Dissertation]. Konstanz: University of Konstanz

@phdthesis{Mojza2008Inter-10784, title={The Interface of Volunteer Work and Paid Work : Benefits of Volunteering for Working Life}, year={2008}, author={Mojza, Eva J.}, address={Konstanz}, school={Universität Konstanz} }

Increasingly, psychologists are dealing with the research question of how different life domains are positively related to each other. While the focus is currently on the interface of family and work (e.g., theories and studies on the positive relationship between family engagement and work engagement; Greenhaus & Powell, 2006; Grzywacz et al., 2006; Rohtbard, 2001), until now the interface of volunteer work and paid work has rarely been scrutinized. However, there is empirical evidence (Kirchmeyer, 1992a, 1992b; Ruderman et al., 2002) for positive relationships between volunteering and paid work. The goal of this dissertation was, hence, to examine whether volunteer work engagement during leisure time benefits well-being and performance at work. Based on theoretical considerations on the relationships between different life domains (Greenhaus & Powell, 2006; Voydanoff, 2001), main and moderator effects of volunteering on well-being and performance at work were focused on. Drawing on theory and research on recovery (Fritz & Sonnentag, 2005; Hobfoll, 1989; Hobfoll & Shirom, 2001; Meijman & Mulder, 1998; Sonnentag & Fritz, 2007), as well as on self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000), it was further examined whether volunteering is related to positive non-work experiences and whether these non-work experiences account for the main effects of volunteering on well-being and performance at work. Positive non-work experiences included the recovery experiences of psychological detachment from work, mastery, and community (Fritz & Sonnentag, 2005; Sonnentag & Fritz, 2007), as well as the satisfaction of basic psychological needs (Deci & Ryan, 2000). Indicators of well-being at work included positive and negative affect and work engagement, while indicators of performance at work included task performance and active listening.<br />The dissertation encompasses four empirical studies. Study 1 was a four-week study, while Studies 2, 3, and 4 were diary studies done over the course of one or two working weeks.<br />The relationship between volunteer work engagement during the weekend and work engagement and active listening during the following working week was the focus of Study 1. One hundred and fifty-nine participants were surveyed over the course of four working weeks. In a survey taken on Monday morning, they indicated whether they had volunteered during the weekend; in a survey taken on Friday afternoon, they indicated their work engagement and active listening at work with respect to the working week. The results of multilevel analyses showed a positive relationship between volunteer work during the weekend and work engagement during the following working week, as well as a positive relationship between volunteer work during the weekend and active listening during the following working week.<br />Study 2 investigated the relationships between volunteer work engagement and the recovery experiences of psychological detachment from work, mastery, and community in the evening. In a diary study conducted over the course of a single working week, 166 participants were asked to indicate before going to bed daily the amount of time they had spent that day on volunteer work activities and the level of the three recovery experiences of psychological detachment from work, mastery, and community. The results of multilevel analyses revealed a positive relationship between the amount of time spent on volunteer work activities and mastery experiences, as well as a positive relationship between the amount of time spent on volunteer work activities and community experiences.<br />Study 3 examined the relationship between volunteer work engagement and the recovery experiences of psychological detachment from work and mastery in the evening, as well as the relationship between volunteer work engagement and the satisfaction of basic psychological needs in the evening. Furthermore, it was examined whether these positive non-work experiences are related to positive and negative affect, task performance and active listening during the following working day. In a diary study over the course of two working weeks, 105 participants filled out a questionnaire each night before going to bed, indicating the amount of time spent on volunteer work, the level of their recovery experiences of psychological detachment from work and mastery, as well as their level of need satisfaction. In a daily questionnaire filled out after work, participants indicated positive and negative affect at work, task performance, and active listening at work. The results of multilevel analyses and multilevel structural equation modeling confirmed that there are positive relationships between the amount of time spent on volunteering, psychological detachment from work, mastery experiences, and the satisfaction of basic psychological needs. Furthermore, volunteering is negatively related to negative affect during the following working day, as well as positively related to active listening during the following working day. Both indirect effects are mediated by need satisfaction.<br />Finally, Study 4 looked at whether volunteering buffered the negative relationship between work stressors and positive affect at work, as well as the negative relationship between work stressors and active listening at work during the following day. Work stressors included time pressure and situational constraints. For this purpose, a diary study with 51 participants was conducted over the course of one working week. In a survey before going to bed, participants indicated the amount of time spent on volunteer work activities in the evening. In an after-work survey on the next day, they listed work stressors, positive affect, and active listening referring to the working day. The results of multilevel analyses revealed that volunteering in the evening moderates the negative relationship between situational constraints and positive affect, and the relationship between situational constraints and active listening during the following working day. After evenings on which participants engaged in volunteer work activities, situational constraints are not associated with positive affect or active listening at work. However, after evenings without volunteering both relationships are negative.<br />Altogether, the results showed positive relationships, in terms of main and moderator effects, between volunteering during leisure time and well-being and performance at work. Furthermore, the results suggested that the non-work experience of the satisfaction of basic psychological needs, which is positively associated with volunteering, acts as a mediator of some of the positive relationships between volunteering during leisure time and well-being and performance at work. In this sense, the results supplemented existing research on the interfaces between life domains and suggested the inclusion of the domain of volunteering in the literature on positive relationships between life domains. eng application/pdf Nutzen vom ehrenamtlichen Engagement für das Arbeitsleben 2011-03-25T09:22:37Z deposit-license Mojza, Eva J. Schnittstelle Ehrenamt und Erwerbsarbeit Mojza, Eva J. The Interface of Volunteer Work and Paid Work : Benefits of Volunteering for Working Life 2011-03-25T09:22:37Z 2008

Dateiabrufe seit 01.10.2014 (Informationen über die Zugriffsstatistik)

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