Bumblebees perceive the spatial layout of their environment in relation to their body size and form to minimize inflight collisions

Lade...
Vorschaubild
Dateien
Zu diesem Dokument gibt es keine Dateien.
Datum
2020
Autor:innen
Ravi, Sridhar
Siesenop, Tim
Bertrand, Olivier
Doussot, Charlotte
Warren, William H.
Combes, Stacey A.
Egelhaaf, Martin
Herausgeber:innen
Kontakt
ISSN der Zeitschrift
Electronic ISSN
ISBN
Bibliografische Daten
Verlag
Schriftenreihe
Auflagebezeichnung
URI (zitierfähiger Link)
ArXiv-ID
Internationale Patentnummer
EU-Projektnummer
DFG-Projektnummer
Angaben zur Forschungsförderung (Freitext)
Projekt
Open Access-Veröffentlichung
Sammlungen
Gesperrt bis
Titel in einer weiteren Sprache
Forschungsvorhaben
Organisationseinheiten
Zeitschriftenheft
Publikationstyp
Zeitschriftenartikel
Publikationsstatus
Published
Erschienen in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. National Academy of Sciences. 2020, 117(49), pp. 31494-31499. ISSN 0027-8424. eISSN 1091-6490. Available under: doi: 10.1073/pnas.2016872117
Zusammenfassung

Animals that move through complex habitats must frequently contend with obstacles in their path. Humans and other highly cognitive vertebrates avoid collisions by perceiving the relationship between the layout of their surroundings and the properties of their own body profile and action capacity. It is unknown whether insects, which have much smaller brains, possess such abilities. We used bumblebees, which vary widely in body size and regularly forage in dense vegetation, to investigate whether flying insects consider their own size when interacting with their surroundings. Bumblebees trained to fly in a tunnel were sporadically presented with an obstructing wall containing a gap that varied in width. Bees successfully flew through narrow gaps, even those that were much smaller than their wingspans, by first performing lateral scanning (side-to-side flights) to visually assess the aperture. Bees then reoriented their in-flight posture (i.e., yaw or heading angle) while passing through, minimizing their projected frontal width and mitigating collisions; in extreme cases, bees flew entirely sideways through the gap. Both the time that bees spent scanning during their approach and the extent to which they reoriented themselves to pass through the gap were determined not by the absolute size of the gap, but by the size of the gap relative to each bee's own wingspan. Our findings suggest that, similar to humans and other vertebrates, flying bumblebees perceive the affordance of their surroundings relative their body size and form to navigate safely through complex environments.

Zusammenfassung in einer weiteren Sprache
Fachgebiet (DDC)
570 Biowissenschaften, Biologie
Schlagwörter
affordances, insect flight, self-size perception, navigation, cluttered environments
Konferenz
Rezension
undefined / . - undefined, undefined
Zitieren
ISO 690RAVI, Sridhar, Tim SIESENOP, Olivier BERTRAND, Liang LI, Charlotte DOUSSOT, William H. WARREN, Stacey A. COMBES, Martin EGELHAAF, 2020. Bumblebees perceive the spatial layout of their environment in relation to their body size and form to minimize inflight collisions. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. National Academy of Sciences. 2020, 117(49), pp. 31494-31499. ISSN 0027-8424. eISSN 1091-6490. Available under: doi: 10.1073/pnas.2016872117
BibTex
@article{Ravi2020-12-08Bumbl-52380,
  year={2020},
  doi={10.1073/pnas.2016872117},
  title={Bumblebees perceive the spatial layout of their environment in relation to their body size and form to minimize inflight collisions},
  number={49},
  volume={117},
  issn={0027-8424},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  pages={31494--31499},
  author={Ravi, Sridhar and Siesenop, Tim and Bertrand, Olivier and Li, Liang and Doussot, Charlotte and Warren, William H. and Combes, Stacey A. and Egelhaaf, Martin}
}
RDF
<rdf:RDF
    xmlns:dcterms="http://purl.org/dc/terms/"
    xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"
    xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
    xmlns:bibo="http://purl.org/ontology/bibo/"
    xmlns:dspace="http://digital-repositories.org/ontologies/dspace/0.1.0#"
    xmlns:foaf="http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/"
    xmlns:void="http://rdfs.org/ns/void#"
    xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#" > 
  <rdf:Description rdf:about="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/52380">
    <void:sparqlEndpoint rdf:resource="http://localhost/fuseki/dspace/sparql"/>
    <dc:contributor>Ravi, Sridhar</dc:contributor>
    <dc:creator>Egelhaaf, Martin</dc:creator>
    <dc:creator>Warren, William H.</dc:creator>
    <dc:contributor>Egelhaaf, Martin</dc:contributor>
    <dc:contributor>Bertrand, Olivier</dc:contributor>
    <dcterms:title>Bumblebees perceive the spatial layout of their environment in relation to their body size and form to minimize inflight collisions</dcterms:title>
    <dspace:isPartOfCollection rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/28"/>
    <dc:contributor>Combes, Stacey A.</dc:contributor>
    <dc:contributor>Doussot, Charlotte</dc:contributor>
    <dcterms:issued>2020-12-08</dcterms:issued>
    <dc:creator>Siesenop, Tim</dc:creator>
    <dc:language>eng</dc:language>
    <bibo:uri rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/handle/123456789/52380"/>
    <dc:creator>Bertrand, Olivier</dc:creator>
    <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2021-01-13T12:22:10Z</dc:date>
    <dc:contributor>Li, Liang</dc:contributor>
    <foaf:homepage rdf:resource="http://localhost:8080/"/>
    <dcterms:available rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2021-01-13T12:22:10Z</dcterms:available>
    <dc:contributor>Siesenop, Tim</dc:contributor>
    <dcterms:abstract xml:lang="eng">Animals that move through complex habitats must frequently contend with obstacles in their path. Humans and other highly cognitive vertebrates avoid collisions by perceiving the relationship between the layout of their surroundings and the properties of their own body profile and action capacity. It is unknown whether insects, which have much smaller brains, possess such abilities. We used bumblebees, which vary widely in body size and regularly forage in dense vegetation, to investigate whether flying insects consider their own size when interacting with their surroundings. Bumblebees trained to fly in a tunnel were sporadically presented with an obstructing wall containing a gap that varied in width. Bees successfully flew through narrow gaps, even those that were much smaller than their wingspans, by first performing lateral scanning (side-to-side flights) to visually assess the aperture. Bees then reoriented their in-flight posture (i.e., yaw or heading angle) while passing through, minimizing their projected frontal width and mitigating collisions; in extreme cases, bees flew entirely sideways through the gap. Both the time that bees spent scanning during their approach and the extent to which they reoriented themselves to pass through the gap were determined not by the absolute size of the gap, but by the size of the gap relative to each bee's own wingspan. Our findings suggest that, similar to humans and other vertebrates, flying bumblebees perceive the affordance of their surroundings relative their body size and form to navigate safely through complex environments.</dcterms:abstract>
    <dc:creator>Li, Liang</dc:creator>
    <dc:contributor>Warren, William H.</dc:contributor>
    <dcterms:isPartOf rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/28"/>
    <dc:creator>Ravi, Sridhar</dc:creator>
    <dc:creator>Doussot, Charlotte</dc:creator>
    <dc:creator>Combes, Stacey A.</dc:creator>
  </rdf:Description>
</rdf:RDF>
Interner Vermerk
xmlui.Submission.submit.DescribeStep.inputForms.label.kops_note_fromSubmitter
Kontakt
URL der Originalveröffentl.
Prüfdatum der URL
Prüfungsdatum der Dissertation
Finanzierungsart
Kommentar zur Publikation
Allianzlizenz
Corresponding Authors der Uni Konstanz vorhanden
Internationale Co-Autor:innen
Universitätsbibliographie
Begutachtet
Ja
Diese Publikation teilen