Evolution of water conservation in humans

Lade...
Vorschaubild
Dateien
Zu diesem Dokument gibt es keine Dateien.
Datum
2021
Autor:innen
Pontzer, Herman
Brown, Mary H.
Wood, Brian M.
Raichlen, David A.
Mabulla, Audax Z. P.
Harris, Jacob A.
Dunsworth, Holly
Hare, Brian
Walker, Kara
et al.
Herausgeber:innen
Kontakt
ISSN der Zeitschrift
Electronic ISSN
ISBN
Bibliografische Daten
Verlag
Schriftenreihe
Auflagebezeichnung
URI (zitierfähiger Link)
ArXiv-ID
Internationale Patentnummer
Angaben zur Forschungsförderung
Projekt
Open Access-Veröffentlichung
Core Facility der Universität Konstanz
Gesperrt bis
Titel in einer weiteren Sprache
Forschungsvorhaben
Organisationseinheiten
Zeitschriftenheft
Publikationstyp
Zeitschriftenartikel
Publikationsstatus
Published
Erschienen in
Current Biology. Cell Press; Elsevier. 2021, 31(8), pp. 1804-1810.e5. ISSN 0960-9822. eISSN 1879-0445. Available under: doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2021.02.045
Zusammenfassung

To sustain life, humans and other terrestrial animals must maintain a tight balance of water gain and water loss each day.1-3 However, the evolution of human water balance physiology is poorly understood due to the absence of comparative measures from other hominoids. While humans drink daily to maintain water balance, rainforest-living great apes typically obtain adequate water from their food and can go days or weeks without drinking4-6. Here, we compare isotope-depletion measures of water turnover (L/d) in zoo- and rainforest-sanctuary-housed apes (chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and orangutans) with 5 diverse human populations, including a hunter-gatherer community in a semi-arid savannah. Across the entire sample, water turnover was strongly related to total energy expenditure (TEE, kcal/d), physical activity, climate (ambient temperature and humidity), and fat free mass. In analyses controlling for those factors, water turnover was 30% to 50% lower in humans than in other apes despite humans' greater sweating capacity. Water turnover in zoo and sanctuary apes was similar to estimated turnover in wild populations, as was the ratio of water intake to dietary energy intake (∼2.8 mL/kcal). However, zoo and sanctuary apes ingested a greater ratio of water to dry matter of food, which might contribute to digestive problems in captivity. Compared to apes, humans appear to target a lower ratio of water/energy intake (∼1.5 mL/kcal). Water stress due to changes in climate, diet, and behavior apparently led to previously unknown water conservation adaptations in hominin physiology.

Zusammenfassung in einer weiteren Sprache
Fachgebiet (DDC)
570 Biowissenschaften, Biologie
Schlagwörter
water turnover, doubly labeled water, hydration, drinking, hominin evolution, hominoid evolution
Konferenz
Rezension
undefined / . - undefined, undefined
Zitieren
ISO 690PONTZER, Herman, Mary H. BROWN, Brian M. WOOD, David A. RAICHLEN, Audax Z. P. MABULLA, Jacob A. HARRIS, Holly DUNSWORTH, Brian HARE, Kara WALKER, Shauhin ALAVI, 2021. Evolution of water conservation in humans. In: Current Biology. Cell Press; Elsevier. 2021, 31(8), pp. 1804-1810.e5. ISSN 0960-9822. eISSN 1879-0445. Available under: doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2021.02.045
BibTex
@article{Pontzer2021-04-26Evolu-53966,
  year={2021},
  doi={10.1016/j.cub.2021.02.045},
  title={Evolution of water conservation in humans},
  number={8},
  volume={31},
  issn={0960-9822},
  journal={Current Biology},
  pages={1804--1810.e5},
  author={Pontzer, Herman and Brown, Mary H. and Wood, Brian M. and Raichlen, David A. and Mabulla, Audax Z. P. and Harris, Jacob A. and Dunsworth, Holly and Hare, Brian and Walker, Kara and Alavi, Shauhin}
}
RDF
<rdf:RDF
    xmlns:dcterms="http://purl.org/dc/terms/"
    xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"
    xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
    xmlns:bibo="http://purl.org/ontology/bibo/"
    xmlns:dspace="http://digital-repositories.org/ontologies/dspace/0.1.0#"
    xmlns:foaf="http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/"
    xmlns:void="http://rdfs.org/ns/void#"
    xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#" > 
  <rdf:Description rdf:about="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/53966">
    <dc:contributor>Walker, Kara</dc:contributor>
    <dc:creator>Mabulla, Audax Z. P.</dc:creator>
    <dc:contributor>Mabulla, Audax Z. P.</dc:contributor>
    <dc:contributor>Dunsworth, Holly</dc:contributor>
    <dcterms:issued>2021-04-26</dcterms:issued>
    <dspace:isPartOfCollection rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/28"/>
    <dc:creator>Alavi, Shauhin</dc:creator>
    <dc:contributor>Harris, Jacob A.</dc:contributor>
    <dcterms:title>Evolution of water conservation in humans</dcterms:title>
    <bibo:uri rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/handle/123456789/53966"/>
    <dc:creator>Dunsworth, Holly</dc:creator>
    <dc:contributor>Pontzer, Herman</dc:contributor>
    <void:sparqlEndpoint rdf:resource="http://localhost/fuseki/dspace/sparql"/>
    <dc:contributor>Wood, Brian M.</dc:contributor>
    <dcterms:abstract xml:lang="eng">To sustain life, humans and other terrestrial animals must maintain a tight balance of water gain and water loss each day.1-3 However, the evolution of human water balance physiology is poorly understood due to the absence of comparative measures from other hominoids. While humans drink daily to maintain water balance, rainforest-living great apes typically obtain adequate water from their food and can go days or weeks without drinking4-6. Here, we compare isotope-depletion measures of water turnover (L/d) in zoo- and rainforest-sanctuary-housed apes (chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and orangutans) with 5 diverse human populations, including a hunter-gatherer community in a semi-arid savannah. Across the entire sample, water turnover was strongly related to total energy expenditure (TEE, kcal/d), physical activity, climate (ambient temperature and humidity), and fat free mass. In analyses controlling for those factors, water turnover was 30% to 50% lower in humans than in other apes despite humans' greater sweating capacity. Water turnover in zoo and sanctuary apes was similar to estimated turnover in wild populations, as was the ratio of water intake to dietary energy intake (∼2.8 mL/kcal). However, zoo and sanctuary apes ingested a greater ratio of water to dry matter of food, which might contribute to digestive problems in captivity. Compared to apes, humans appear to target a lower ratio of water/energy intake (∼1.5 mL/kcal). Water stress due to changes in climate, diet, and behavior apparently led to previously unknown water conservation adaptations in hominin physiology.</dcterms:abstract>
    <dcterms:isPartOf rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/28"/>
    <dc:creator>Hare, Brian</dc:creator>
    <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2021-06-14T10:13:30Z</dc:date>
    <dc:contributor>Hare, Brian</dc:contributor>
    <dc:creator>Walker, Kara</dc:creator>
    <dc:creator>Wood, Brian M.</dc:creator>
    <dc:language>eng</dc:language>
    <dc:contributor>Brown, Mary H.</dc:contributor>
    <dc:contributor>Alavi, Shauhin</dc:contributor>
    <dc:contributor>Raichlen, David A.</dc:contributor>
    <dc:creator>Raichlen, David A.</dc:creator>
    <dc:creator>Pontzer, Herman</dc:creator>
    <dc:creator>Harris, Jacob A.</dc:creator>
    <foaf:homepage rdf:resource="http://localhost:8080/"/>
    <dc:creator>Brown, Mary H.</dc:creator>
    <dcterms:available rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2021-06-14T10:13:30Z</dcterms:available>
  </rdf:Description>
</rdf:RDF>
Interner Vermerk
xmlui.Submission.submit.DescribeStep.inputForms.label.kops_note_fromSubmitter
Kontakt
URL der Originalveröffentl.
Prüfdatum der URL
Prüfungsdatum der Dissertation
Finanzierungsart
Kommentar zur Publikation
Allianzlizenz
Corresponding Authors der Uni Konstanz vorhanden
Internationale Co-Autor:innen
Universitätsbibliographie
Ja
Begutachtet
Ja
Diese Publikation teilen