Rush hours in flower visitors over a day-night cycle

Lade...
Vorschaubild
Dateien
Zu diesem Dokument gibt es keine Dateien.
Datum
2018
Autor:innen
Knop, Eva
Gerpe, Christopher
Ryser, Remo
Hofmann, Fabian
Trösch, Sandra
Ursenbacher, Stefan
Zoller, Leana
Fontaine, Colin
Herausgeber:innen
Kontakt
ISSN der Zeitschrift
Electronic ISSN
ISBN
Bibliografische Daten
Verlag
Schriftenreihe
Auflagebezeichnung
URI (zitierfähiger Link)
DOI (zitierfähiger Link)
ArXiv-ID
Internationale Patentnummer
Angaben zur Forschungsförderung
Projekt
Open Access-Veröffentlichung
Sammlungen
Core Facility der Universität Konstanz
Gesperrt bis
Titel in einer weiteren Sprache
Forschungsvorhaben
Organisationseinheiten
Zeitschriftenheft
Publikationstyp
Zeitschriftenartikel
Publikationsstatus
Published
Erschienen in
Insect Conservation and Diversity. Wiley-Blackwell. 2018, 11(3), pp. 267-275. ISSN 1752-458X. eISSN 1752-4598. Available under: doi: 10.1111/icad.12277
Zusammenfassung
  1. Most research on pollination has focussed on a subset of insect taxa within a narrow time window during daylight hours. As a consequence, we have a limited understanding of the diversity and activity of flower visitors during the night or belonging to taxa other than bees or syrphid flies. Here, we quantified the abundance and species richness of flower visitors in ruderal meadows over repeated 24‐h cycles (i.e. day and night), and identified abiotic factors influencing these patterns. From the plant perspective, we investigated the likelihood of being visited by an insect across a 24‐h cycle.

    2. Activity of flower‐visiting insects never dropped to zero over 24‐h. During the day, non‐syrphid Diptera and Hymenoptera were the most abundant, and species‐rich groups of flower visitors, Lepidoptera and Coleoptera during night. While two of the seven most frequently visited plant species were most likely to be visited during the day, five also had a high likelihood to be visited during the night.

    3. The abundance and species richness of flower visitors was positively related to temperature during both the day and the night, whereas there was only a positive relationship with brightness during the day.

    4. We conclude that non‐syrphid Diptera and nocturnal flower visitors are currently underappreciated. As the latter seem to respond differently to abiotic factors compared to diurnal species, they may potentially increase response diversity and resilience of plant‐pollinator communities. There is an urgent need to improve our understanding of their ecological role and potential decline due to global change.
Zusammenfassung in einer weiteren Sprache
Fachgebiet (DDC)
570 Biowissenschaften, Biologie
Schlagwörter
Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, invertebrates, Lepidoptera, mixed pollination system, Moth, night‐time activity, nocturnal pollination
Konferenz
Rezension
undefined / . - undefined, undefined
Zitieren
ISO 690KNOP, Eva, Christopher GERPE, Remo RYSER, Fabian HOFMANN, Myles MENZ, Sandra TRÖSCH, Stefan URSENBACHER, Leana ZOLLER, Colin FONTAINE, 2018. Rush hours in flower visitors over a day-night cycle. In: Insect Conservation and Diversity. Wiley-Blackwell. 2018, 11(3), pp. 267-275. ISSN 1752-458X. eISSN 1752-4598. Available under: doi: 10.1111/icad.12277
BibTex
@article{Knop2018-05hours-50665,
  year={2018},
  doi={10.1111/icad.12277},
  title={Rush hours in flower visitors over a day-night cycle},
  number={3},
  volume={11},
  issn={1752-458X},
  journal={Insect Conservation and Diversity},
  pages={267--275},
  author={Knop, Eva and Gerpe, Christopher and Ryser, Remo and Hofmann, Fabian and Menz, Myles and Trösch, Sandra and Ursenbacher, Stefan and Zoller, Leana and Fontaine, Colin}
}
RDF
<rdf:RDF
    xmlns:dcterms="http://purl.org/dc/terms/"
    xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"
    xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
    xmlns:bibo="http://purl.org/ontology/bibo/"
    xmlns:dspace="http://digital-repositories.org/ontologies/dspace/0.1.0#"
    xmlns:foaf="http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/"
    xmlns:void="http://rdfs.org/ns/void#"
    xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#" > 
  <rdf:Description rdf:about="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/50665">
    <dc:contributor>Zoller, Leana</dc:contributor>
    <dc:contributor>Knop, Eva</dc:contributor>
    <dc:contributor>Trösch, Sandra</dc:contributor>
    <dcterms:issued>2018-05</dcterms:issued>
    <dc:date rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-09-02T10:43:23Z</dc:date>
    <dc:contributor>Ursenbacher, Stefan</dc:contributor>
    <dc:contributor>Fontaine, Colin</dc:contributor>
    <bibo:uri rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/handle/123456789/50665"/>
    <dc:creator>Ursenbacher, Stefan</dc:creator>
    <dcterms:isPartOf rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/28"/>
    <dc:creator>Trösch, Sandra</dc:creator>
    <dc:creator>Gerpe, Christopher</dc:creator>
    <dcterms:available rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime">2020-09-02T10:43:23Z</dcterms:available>
    <dc:creator>Hofmann, Fabian</dc:creator>
    <dc:language>eng</dc:language>
    <dc:creator>Menz, Myles</dc:creator>
    <dc:creator>Ryser, Remo</dc:creator>
    <void:sparqlEndpoint rdf:resource="http://localhost/fuseki/dspace/sparql"/>
    <dc:contributor>Menz, Myles</dc:contributor>
    <dc:contributor>Hofmann, Fabian</dc:contributor>
    <dcterms:title>Rush hours in flower visitors over a day-night cycle</dcterms:title>
    <foaf:homepage rdf:resource="http://localhost:8080/"/>
    <dc:contributor>Ryser, Remo</dc:contributor>
    <dc:rights>terms-of-use</dc:rights>
    <dcterms:rights rdf:resource="https://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/"/>
    <dc:contributor>Gerpe, Christopher</dc:contributor>
    <dc:creator>Zoller, Leana</dc:creator>
    <dc:creator>Fontaine, Colin</dc:creator>
    <dspace:isPartOfCollection rdf:resource="https://kops.uni-konstanz.de/server/rdf/resource/123456789/28"/>
    <dc:creator>Knop, Eva</dc:creator>
    <dcterms:abstract xml:lang="eng">1. Most research on pollination has focussed on a subset of insect taxa within a narrow time window during daylight hours. As a consequence, we have a limited understanding of the diversity and activity of flower visitors during the night or belonging to taxa other than bees or syrphid flies. Here, we quantified the abundance and species richness of flower visitors in ruderal meadows over repeated 24‐h cycles (i.e. day and night), and identified abiotic factors influencing these patterns. From the plant perspective, we investigated the likelihood of being visited by an insect across a 24‐h cycle.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;2.  Activity of flower‐visiting insects never dropped to zero over 24‐h. During the day, non‐syrphid Diptera and Hymenoptera were the most abundant, and species‐rich groups of flower visitors, Lepidoptera and Coleoptera during night. While two of the seven most frequently visited plant species were most likely to be visited during the day, five also had a high likelihood to be visited during the night.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;3. The abundance and species richness of flower visitors was positively related to temperature during both the day and the night, whereas there was only a positive relationship with brightness during the day.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;4. We conclude that non‐syrphid Diptera and nocturnal flower visitors are currently underappreciated. As the latter seem to respond differently to abiotic factors compared to diurnal species, they may potentially increase response diversity and resilience of plant‐pollinator communities. There is an urgent need to improve our understanding of their ecological role and potential decline due to global change.</dcterms:abstract>
  </rdf:Description>
</rdf:RDF>
Interner Vermerk
xmlui.Submission.submit.DescribeStep.inputForms.label.kops_note_fromSubmitter
Kontakt
URL der Originalveröffentl.
Prüfdatum der URL
Prüfungsdatum der Dissertation
Finanzierungsart
Kommentar zur Publikation
Allianzlizenz
Corresponding Authors der Uni Konstanz vorhanden
Internationale Co-Autor:innen
Universitätsbibliographie
Begutachtet
Ja
Diese Publikation teilen