Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) in Public Administration

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THOMPSON, William R., ed.. Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019. ISBN 978-0-19-022863-7. Available under: doi: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190228637.013.1444
Zusammenfassung

Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) is increasingly establishing itself as a method in social research. QCA is a set-theoretic, truth-table-based method that identifies complex combinations of conditions (configurations) that are necessary and/or sufficient for an outcome. An advantage of QCA is that it models the complexity of social phenomena by accounting for conjunctural, asymmetric, and equifinal patterns. Accordingly, the method does not assume isolated net effects of single variables but recognizes that the effect of a single condition (that is, an explanatory factor) often unfolds only in combination with other conditions. Moreover, QCA acknowledges that the occurrence of a phenomenon can have a different explanation from its non-occurrence. Finally, QCA allows for different, mutually non-exclusive explanations of the same phenomenon. QCA is not only a technique; there is a diversity of approaches to how it can be implemented before, during and after the “technical moment,” depending on the analytic goals related to contributing to theory, engaging with cases, and the approach to explanation. Particularly since 2012, an increasing number of scholars have turned to using QCA to investigate public administrations. Even though the boundaries of Public Administration (PA) as an academic discipline are difficult to determine, it can be defined as an intellectual forum for those who want to understand both public administrations as organizations and their relationships to political, economic, and societal actors—especially in the adoption and implementation of public policies. Owing to its fragmented nature, there has been a long-lasting debate about the methodological sophistication and appropriateness of different comparative methods. In particular, the high complexity and strong context dependencies of causal patterns challenge theory-building and empirical analysis in Public Administration. Moreover, administrative settings are often characterized by relatively low numbers of cases for comparison, as well as strongly multilevel empirical settings. QCA as a technique allows for context-sensitive analyses that take into account this complexity. Against this background, it is not surprising that applications of QCA have become more widespread among scholars of Public Administration. A systematic review of articles using QCA published in the major Public Administration journals shows that the use of QCA started in mid-2000s and then grew exponentially. The review shows that, especially in two thematic areas, QCA has high analytical value and may (alongside traditional methodological approaches) help improve theories and methods of PA. The first area is the study of organizational decision-making and the role of bureaucrats during the adoption and implementation of public policies and service delivery. The second area where QCA has great merits is in explaining different features of public organizations. Especially in evaluation research where the aim is to investigate performance of various kinds (especially effectiveness in terms of both policy and management), QCA is a useful analytical tool to model these highly context-dependent relationships. The QCA method is constantly evolving. The development of good practices for different QCA approaches as well as several methodological innovations and software improvements increases its potential benefits for the future of Public Administration research.

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ISO 690THOMANN, Eva, Jörn EGE, 2019. Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) in Public Administration. In: THOMPSON, William R., ed.. Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019. ISBN 978-0-19-022863-7. Available under: doi: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190228637.013.1444
BibTex
@incollection{Thomann2019Quali-52372,
  year={2019},
  doi={10.1093/acrefore/9780190228637.013.1444},
  title={Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) in Public Administration},
  isbn={978-0-19-022863-7},
  publisher={Oxford University Press},
  address={Oxford},
  booktitle={Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics},
  editor={Thompson, William R.},
  author={Thomann, Eva and Ege, Jörn}
}
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