Seasonality impacts collective movements in a wild group-living bird

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Papageorgiou_2-149ou92rj56510.pdf
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2021
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Rozen-Rechels, David
Nyaguthii, Brendah
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Movement Ecology. BioMed Central. 2021, 9, 38. eISSN 2051-3933. Available under: doi: 10.1186/s40462-021-00271-9
Zusammenfassung

Background
A challenge faced by animals living in groups with stable long-term membership is to effectively coordinate their actions and maintain cohesion. However, as seasonal conditions alter the distribution of resources across a landscape, they can change the priority of group members and require groups to adapt and respond collectively across changing contexts. Little is known about how stable group-living animals collectively modify their movement behaviour in response to environment changes, such as those induced by seasonality. Further, it remains unclear how environment-induced changes in group-level movement behaviours might scale up to affect population-level properties, such as a population’s footprint.

Methods
Here we studied the collective movement of each distinct social group in a population of vulturine guineafowl (Acryllium vulturinum), a largely terrestrial and non-territorial bird. We used high-resolution GPS tracking of group members over 22 months, combined with continuous time movement models, to capture how and where groups moved under varying conditions, driven by seasonality and drought.

Results
Groups used larger areas, travelled longer distances, and moved to new places more often during drier seasons, causing a three-fold increase in the area used at the population level when conditions turned to drought. By contrast, groups used smaller areas with more regular movements during wetter seasons.

Conclusions
The consistent changes in collective outcomes we observed in response to different environments raise questions about the role of collective behaviour in facilitating, or impeding, the capacity for individuals to respond to novel environmental conditions. As droughts will be occurring more often under climate change, some group living animals may have to respond to them by expressing dramatic shifts in their regular movement patterns. These shifts can have consequences on their ranging behaviours that can scale up to alter the footprints of animal populations.

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570 Biowissenschaften, Biologie
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ISO 690PAPAGEORGIOU, Danai, David ROZEN-RECHELS, Brendah NYAGUTHII, Damien R. FARINE, 2021. Seasonality impacts collective movements in a wild group-living bird. In: Movement Ecology. BioMed Central. 2021, 9, 38. eISSN 2051-3933. Available under: doi: 10.1186/s40462-021-00271-9
BibTex
@article{Papageorgiou2021-07-08Seaso-54297,
  year={2021},
  doi={10.1186/s40462-021-00271-9},
  title={Seasonality impacts collective movements in a wild group-living bird},
  volume={9},
  journal={Movement Ecology},
  author={Papageorgiou, Danai and Rozen-Rechels, David and Nyaguthii, Brendah and Farine, Damien R.},
  note={The research was funded by the Max Planck Society, grants from the Daimler und Benz Stiftung (32–03/16), the Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour, the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No. 850859), and an Eccellenza Professorship from the Swiss National Science Foundation (grant number PCEFP3_187058 awarded to DRF). D.P. received additional funding from the International Max Planck Research School for Organismal Biology, a DAAD PhD fellowship and an Early Career Grant from the National Geographic Society (WW-175ER-17). D.R-R. was funded by a Humboldt Research Fellowship for Postdoctoral Researchers. The study benefited from additional support from the DFG Centre of Excellence 2117 “Centre for the Advanced Study of Collective Behaviour” (ID: 422037984) and from an Interdisciplinary Collaborative Projects Grant by the Zukunftskolleg of the University of Konstanz (funded as part of the Excellence Strategy of the German Federal and State Governments). Open Access funding enabled and organized by Projekt DEAL. Article Number: 38}
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The research was funded by the Max Planck Society, grants from the Daimler und Benz Stiftung (32–03/16), the Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour, the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No. 850859), and an Eccellenza Professorship from the Swiss National Science Foundation (grant number PCEFP3_187058 awarded to DRF). D.P. received additional funding from the International Max Planck Research School for Organismal Biology, a DAAD PhD fellowship and an Early Career Grant from the National Geographic Society (WW-175ER-17). D.R-R. was funded by a Humboldt Research Fellowship for Postdoctoral Researchers. The study benefited from additional support from the DFG Centre of Excellence 2117 “Centre for the Advanced Study of Collective Behaviour” (ID: 422037984) and from an Interdisciplinary Collaborative Projects Grant by the Zukunftskolleg of the University of Konstanz (funded as part of the Excellence Strategy of the German Federal and State Governments). Open Access funding enabled and organized by Projekt DEAL.
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