Dominance style is a key predictor of vocal use and evolution across nonhuman primates

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Date
2021
Authors
Kavanagh, Eithne
Street, Sally E.
Angwela, Felix O.
Bergman, Thore J.
Blaszczyk, Maryjka B.
Bolt, Laura M.
Briseño-Jaramillo, Margarita
Brown, Michelle
Slocombe, Katie
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Royal Society open science ; 8 (2021), 7. - 210873. - Royal Society of London. - ISSN 2054-5703
Abstract
Animal communication has long been thought to be subject to pressures and constraints associated with social relationships. However, our understanding of how the nature and quality of social relationships relates to the use and evolution of communication is limited by a lack of directly comparable methods across multiple levels of analysis. Here, we analysed observational data from 111 wild groups belonging to 26 non-human primate species, to test how vocal communication relates to dominance style (the strictness with which a dominance hierarchy is enforced, ranging from 'despotic' to 'tolerant'). At the individual-level, we found that dominant individuals who were more tolerant vocalized at a higher rate than their despotic counterparts. This indicates that tolerance within a relationship may place pressure on the dominant partner to communicate more during social interactions. At the species-level, however, despotic species exhibited a larger repertoire of hierarchy-related vocalizations than their tolerant counterparts. Findings suggest primate signals are used and evolve in tandem with the nature of interactions that characterize individuals' social relationships.
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570 Biosciences, Biology
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vocal, sociality, communication, dominance style, social behaviour
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Cite This
ISO 690KAVANAGH, Eithne, Sally E. STREET, Felix O. ANGWELA, Thore J. BERGMAN, Maryjka B. BLASZCZYK, Laura M. BOLT, Margarita BRISEÑO-JARAMILLO, Michelle BROWN, Barbara FRUTH, Katie SLOCOMBE, 2021. Dominance style is a key predictor of vocal use and evolution across nonhuman primates. In: Royal Society open science. Royal Society of London. 8(7), 210873. ISSN 2054-5703. Available under: doi: 10.1098/rsos.210873
BibTex
@article{Kavanagh2021-07Domin-56490,
  year={2021},
  doi={10.1098/rsos.210873},
  title={Dominance style is a key predictor of vocal use and evolution across nonhuman primates},
  number={7},
  volume={8},
  issn={2054-5703},
  journal={Royal Society open science},
  author={Kavanagh, Eithne and Street, Sally E. and Angwela, Felix O. and Bergman, Thore J. and Blaszczyk, Maryjka B. and Bolt, Laura M. and Briseño-Jaramillo, Margarita and Brown, Michelle and Fruth, Barbara and Slocombe, Katie},
  note={Article Number: 210873}
}
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