Negative Effects of Cyanotoxins and Adaptative Responses of Daphnia

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The plethora of cyanobacterial toxins are an enormous threat to whole ecosystems and humans. Due to eutrophication and increases in lake temperatures from global warming, changes in the distribution of cyanobacterial toxins and selection of few highly toxic species/ strains are likely. Globally, one of the most important grazers that controls cyanobacterial blooms is Daphnia, a freshwater model organism in ecology and (eco)toxicology. Daphnia–cyanobacteria interactions have been studied extensively, often focusing on the interference of filamentous cyanobacteria with Daphnia’s filtering apparatus, or on different nutritional constraints (the lack of essential amino acids or lipids) and grazer toxicity. For a long time, this toxicity only referred to microcystins. Currently, the focus shifts toward other deleterious cyanotoxins. Still, less than 10% of the total scientific output deals with cyanotoxins that are not microcystins; although these other cyanotoxins can occur just as frequently and at similar concentrations as microcystins in surface water. This review discusses the effects of different cyanobacterial toxins (hepatotoxins, digestive inhibitors, neurotoxins, and cytotoxins) on Daphnia and provides an elaborate and up-to-date overview of specific responses and adaptations of Daphnia. Furthermore, scenarios of what we can expect for the future of Daphnia–cyanobacteria interactions are described by comprising anthropogenic threats that might further increase toxin stress in Daphnia.

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570 Biowissenschaften, Biologie
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carboxypeptidase inhibitors; protease inhibitors; microcystins; anatoxin; cylindrosper; mopsin; anthropogenic stressors
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ISO 690SCHWARZENBERGER, Anke, 2022. Negative Effects of Cyanotoxins and Adaptative Responses of Daphnia. In: Toxins. MDPI. 2022, 14(11), 770. eISSN 2072-6651. Available under: doi: 10.3390/toxins14110770
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@article{Schwarzenberger2022-11-07Negat-59144,
  year={2022},
  doi={10.3390/toxins14110770},
  title={Negative Effects of Cyanotoxins and Adaptative Responses of Daphnia},
  number={11},
  volume={14},
  journal={Toxins},
  author={Schwarzenberger, Anke},
  note={Article Number: 770}
}
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