Wiese, Lorenz

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Wiese
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Lorenz
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Verwaltungsresilienz unter Stressbedingungen

2022, Seibel, Wolfgang, Eckardt, Christine, Huffert, Friedrich, Mende, Lisa, Wiese, Lorenz

Der Beitrag bezieht sich kritisch auf stereotype Charakterisierungen der bürokratischen Organisationsform öffentlicher Verwaltung als unflexibel und innovationsfeindlich und entwickelt auf der Grundlage einer empirischen Untersuchung zu Ausmaß und Gestalt flexibler und partizipativer Handlungsformen der Verwaltung in der sogenannten Flüchtlingskrise von 2015 und 2016 ein Kategorienschema für Varianten adaptiver Entscheidungsstile und Entscheidungsstrukturen lokaler Verwaltungen – Landkreise und kreisfreie Städte – unter Stressbedingungen. Zentrales Argument der Abhandlung ist, dass Verwaltungen in Phasen intensivierter Problemlösungsanforderungen unterschiedliche Formen von adaptiver Flexibilität und der Partizipation von zivilgesellschaftlichen Akteur_innen als Resilienzreserven mobilisieren. Dies geschieht, so das Argument, allerdings nur, wenn der Problemdruck auch in seiner Dynamik berechenbar bleibt und die institutionellen und politischen Rahmenbedingungen ansonsten konstant gehalten werden können.

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Was Einwanderungsländer (nicht) voneinander lernen können : Ein Blick hinter die Kulissen Kanadas, Australiens und Deutschlands

2020, Wiese, Lorenz

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Wege zur Einbindung von Freiwilligen : Lehren aus der sogenannten Flüchtlingskrise

2019, Roth, Florian, Käser, Marco, Lenz, Alexa, Eckhard, Steffen, Wiese, Lorenz, Seibel, Wolfgang

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Understanding local crisis management in complex organisational settings : The case of the migration crisis in Germany 2015/16

2018, Roth, Florian, Seibel, Wolfgang, Wiese, Lorenz, Fatke, Matthias, Eckhard, Steffen, Lenz, Alexa

This paper offers a first conceptual step towards measuring what effect variation of administrative action in crisis management has on societal resilience during times of crisis. Building on previous work, we see the ability of administrations to moderate the (perceived) legitimacy of their actions in crisis management as the main mechanism for such an effect. Local administrations can enhance legitimacy a) if they create conditions for the participation of organized forms of civic engagement in crisis management, and b) if they manage the crisis effectively. The concept of “organizational hybridity” is introduced to propose four possible styles of administrative crisis management: Street-level bureaucracy; leadership-based administration; consultative administration; and classic-bureaucratic administration. The paper briefly discusses how this concept could be applied in the context of the German “migration crisis” of 2015/16.

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Flexibel durch die Krise : Handlungsempfehlungen für die lokale Verwaltung

2021, Mende, Lisa, Scharte, Benjamin, Wiese, Lorenz, Lenz, Alexa, Roth, Florian, Seibel, Wolfgang, Eckhard, Steffen

Erkenntnisse aus dem Forschungsprojekt «HybOrg – Entstehung und gesellschaftliche Wirkung hybrider Organisationen im lokalen Krisenmanagement»

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Bericht zum Workshop "Wissenschaft trifft Praxis - Methoden, Erfahrungen, Mehrwert" am 6.-7.5.2019 in Konstanz

2019, Wiese, Lorenz, Roth, Florian

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Latent Organisational Hybridity in Administrative Crisis Management : The German Refugee Crisis of 2015/16

2019, Lenz, Alexa, Eckhard, Steffen, Fatke, Matthias, Wiese, Lorenz, Roth, Florian, Seibel, Wolfgang

Despite presenting as global challenges, the societal effects of climate change or migration movements are felt primarily at the local level. This poses challenges to administrative crisis management. In this paper, we introduce the concept of ‘latent organizational hybridity’ to theorize how local administrations can effectively address crisis situations. Instead of theorizing the exact administrative design features fit for an effective crisis response, we emphasize informal and temporal (latent) deviations from administrative routine action along operational principles borrowed from the private and non-profit sector (hybridity), in particular internal flexibilization and citizen participation. We report novel data collected from a survey of administrative crisis management organizations involved in the so-called German refugee crisis of 2015/16, covering more than half of all 401 county-level administrations. We test the effects of the different forms of latent hybridity on administrative effectiveness using regression modelling. Findings indicate that changes in administrative routines towards more flexible and participatory action have a positive impact on crisis management effectiveness. The effect of flexible activity was especially pronounced in counties and cities that were allocated higher shares of asylum seekers.

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Freiwillige in der Krise erfolgreich(er) einbinden : Handlungsempfehlungen für die lokale Verwaltung

2021, Mende, Lisa, Scharte, Benjamin, Wiese, Lorenz, Lenz, Alexa, Roth, Florian, Seibel, Wolfgang, Eckhard, Steffen

Erkenntnisse aus dem Forschungsprojekt «HybOrg – Entstehung und gesellschaftliche Wirkung hybrider Organisationen im lokalen Krisenmanagement»

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Refugees welcome? : How Germany, Canada, and Australia respond to contemporary migration

2019, Wiese, Lorenz

This dissertation studies how three different liberal democracies; Germany, Canada, and Australia, have experienced and reacted to contemporary migration, focusing on asylum seekers and refugees. Conceptually, it assumes that their admission leads to paradoxes for host states’ governmental apparatuses: If these migrants’ reasons to seek new lives outside of their home countries and regions are recognized, they need to be granted protection statuses and thus be ‘welcomed’ to stay temporarily or permanently. As a consequence of public ‘backlashes’ and anxieties, destination countries’ governments have however increasingly attempted to control and restrict their entry. To understand these phenomena, this study explains the underlying incentives and scopes for handling contemporary migratory movements primarily from a governmental top-down point of view. Historical institutionalism helps to understand the path-dependent emergence of certain policies in the context of each state’s particular actor constellations. Approaches taken from public choice theory are adopted to illuminate the connection between societal sentiments, discourses, and domestic political decisionmaking. Insights from delegation, blame and signaling games are used to complete this picture. Supplemented by expert interviews, the empirical part of this study deciphers the observable political developments, as well as the resulting administrative asylum/refugee regimes in 21st century Germany, Canada, and Australia. The selected cases include one ‘newcomer’ and two ‘classic’ immigration countries. In line with the conceptual model, its focus lies on key actors’ influences in the corresponding institutional set-ups, as well as the internal developments that are shaped by the historical paths, discourses and public opinion. The crosscountry comparison in this most different systems design shows that, although Germany’s, Canada’s, and Australia’s humanitarian commitments and overall experiences with contemporary migratory movements have differed sharply in many regards, certain phenomena have been recurring. In particular, political elites in all three states have been maneuvering fine lines between different policy objectives, attempting to ‘filter’ and ‘manage’ migration and settlement. The advancing externalization of border regimes made it more difficult to physically reach these states in the first place. But also once there, migrants have been facing other obstacles before eventually being granted protection statuses and the corresponding socioeconomic rights. The legal regimes have been complemented by widely hidden practices of ‘administrative deterrence’ aiming at the reduction of so-called ‘pull factors’. This has entailed dysfunctional and discriminatory refugee status determination systems which pit different migrant groups against each other and leave many in legal uncertainty for long periods. Only for particular subgroups of refugees, the way to an arrival in dignity has been paved in all three states. Further crucially, the observable overall convergence to more selective admission frameworks cannot distract from the fact that related challenges have been of completely different scales: The implementation of well-functioning asylum administrations certainly depends on the corresponding claimants’ numbers and profiles. Domestic conflicts over material priorities have nonetheless contributed to the development of short-term pseudo-solutions to the inherent dilemmas in all three cases. These often came at the expense of procedural fairness and long-term goals such as social ‘integration’. Instead of reflecting strategic decisions, many findings thus point out to political ‘muddling through’. The comparison of their preconditions and the corresponding outcomes provides starting points for emulating, consolidating or abolishing certain policies – in order to achieve more coherent and evidence-based decisionmaking in this controversial area.

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Keep them out at any cost? : Reconsidering the EU-Turkey deal in light of reason, norms and rhetoric

2018, Wiese, Lorenz

By examining the EU-Turkey deal, this study links the studies of regional enlargement and the externalization of migration governance. It argues that supply-state-centric theories may not adequately grasp situations in which accession candidates enjoy enhanced bargaining power: Due to Turkey’s strategically important position for the EU’s ‘migration management’, a revival of dialogues was promised despite adverse conditions. Arguably, the paramount objective of outsourcing border control ‘at any cost’ demonstrates the real-political submission of ‘European values’ to domestic pressures in the supply-states: An almost consensual imperative of ‘relieving migratory pressures’ prevailed over concerns about democratic conditions and human rights in the aspiring country. The present case further serves as a telling example for ‘humanitarian’ lip service payed to the aims of refugee protection, used to increase the pact’s viability. Existing theoretical accounts may thus benefit from better accounting for the interdependzent influence of external shocks, internal developments and accompanying rhetoric on the cost structure of multilevel ‘games’.