Eckmann, Reiner

Lade...
Profilbild
E-Mail-Adresse
ORCID
Geburtsdatum
Forschungsvorhaben
Organisationseinheiten
Berufsbeschreibung
Nachname
Eckmann
Vorname
Reiner
Name

Suchergebnisse Publikationen

Gerade angezeigt 1 - 3 von 3
Lade...
Vorschaubild
Veröffentlichung

Hydroacoustic observations of surface shoaling behaviour of young-of-the-year perch Perca fluviatilis (Linnaeus, 1758) with a towed upward-facing transducer

2009, Probst, Wolfgang Nikolaus, Thomas, Gregor, Eckmann, Reiner

The near-surface distribution of young-of-the-year perch was observed with a towed upward beaming echosounder system (SIMRAD EK60 with a circular 7◦ transducer). Perch aggregated densely in the epilimnion during daytime and dispersed evenly below the surface at night. Shoaling commenced in late June when perch metamorphosed from the larval to juvenile stage. Average shoal width was 6.6 m and average shoal height was 2.35 m in July, when perch were observed for the last time in the pelagic zone of Lake Constance.
Upward echosounding revealed the presence and near-surface distribution of pelagic juvenile perch and therefore this method can be used as a complementary survey tool to get more precise information about the distribution, behaviour and abundance of near-surface fish.

Lade...
Vorschaubild
Veröffentlichung

Lake water level increase during spring affects the breeding success of bream Abramis brama (L.)

2009, Probst, Wolfgang Nikolaus, Stoll, Stefan, Peters, Lars, Fischer, Philipp, Eckmann, Reiner

In Lake Constance, Eurasian bream Abramis brama (L.) spawn in very shallow littoral areas by the beginning of May. They attach their adhesive eggs to pebble and cobble substratum at 40 cm depth. Increasing water levels before spawning inundate bare substratum to which bream eggs may attach better than to deeper substratum covered by epilithon. Consequently, the water level increase prior to spawning should determine the amount of pristine spawning substratum available to bream and thus influence their breeding success. In order to test this hypothesis, the influence of hydrology and climate on the abundance of age-0 bream was combined with the results from field investigations on the egg survival and abundance of age-0 bream. A strong positive correlation between the mean water level increase during the spawning season of bream (April May) and the abundance of juvenile bream was found. In contrast, the absolute water level during spawning and during the nursery stage in summer, the cumulative temperature during the egg, larval and juvenile stages and two North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) indices did not affect the abundance of juvenile bream. The field investigations confirmed that bream eggs attach better to and have higher survival rates on bare substratum than on substratum with epilithon cover. Accordingly, eggs within a spawning habitat of bream were most abundant between 10 and 20 cm depth, where the epilithon cover was lower than at depths exceeding 30 cm. The results of this study confirm an adverse influence of epilithon cover on the attachment and subsequent survival of bream eggs and emphasize the importance of spring inundations for the successful breeding of the bream.

Lade...
Vorschaubild
Veröffentlichung

Spawning site selection by Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis L.) in relation to temperature and wave exposure

2009, Probst, Wolfgang Nikolaus, Stoll, Stefan, Hofmann, Hilmar, Fischer, Philipp, Eckmann, Reiner

The selection of spawning depth by Eurasian perch Perca fluviatilis was investigated in an experiment using artificial substrata in Lake Constance during the spawning season of 2007. The experiment compared spawning behaviour at substrata between 0.5 and 15 m depth at two sites exposed to different regimes of ship-generated wave action. The total abundance of egg ribbons did not differ significantly between the two sites, but the preferred spawning depth was deeper at the wave exposed site (5 m) compared to the sheltered site (2 m). While water temperatures could not account for the observations, differences in wave exposure may explain the different spawning depth preferences. At both sites, large egg ribbons were generally found in deeper water, and large egg ribbons occurred more frequently at the sheltered site. Because the egg ribbons of perch are likely to have a size-dependent susceptibility to hydrodynamic stress, large females may be expected to select deeper spawning locations where the effects of surface waves are considerably attenuated.