Person:
Class, Monika

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Class
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Monika
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Now showing 1 - 5 of 5
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Medicine and Narration in the Eighteenth Century

2015, Class, Monika

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Coleridge and Kantian Ideas in England, 1796-1817 : Coleridge's Responses to German Philosophy

2014, Class, Monika

Samuel Taylor Coleridge was the central figure in the transmission of German idealism in England during the first half of the nineteenth century. This book reconsiders Coleridge's engagement with Immanuel Kant's philosophy. The analysis of the Kantian materials in circulation in print culture in 1790s England suggests that when critical philosophy initially arrived, it had a greater impact on native debates than is commonly recognized. Drawing on a range of pamphlets, advertisements and reviews, Class brings to light the socio-political relevance of Kantianism particularly in the English radical milieu around William Godwin and John Thelwall, and highlights the significance of the less well-known disseminators of critical philosophy for Coleridge's life-long study of Kant's philosophy: F. A. Nitsch and Dr Thomas Beddoes. Tracing Coleridge's winding paths from the Quantock Hills over London taverns to Highgate, this monograph dismantles the myth of the single connoisseur of Kantian "moonshine" and contends that Coleridge's assimilation of critical philosophy was part and parcel of the poet's Unitarianism as a young radical.

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Observation Naturalised : A Comparative Analysis of F. J. Gall's Brain-Based Psychology

2015, Class, Monika

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K. P. Moritz's Case Poetics : Aesthetic Autonomy Reconsidered

2014, Class, Monika

To historians of medicine, Karl Philipp Moritz is known as the founding editor of the Magazine for Empirical Psychology (1783–93), one the oldest psychiatric journals in Europe. In literary theory, Moritz counts as one of the inaugurators of aesthetic autonomy. Combining both fields, this article uncovers that Moritz’s interest in observation, his reservations towards rationality, and his concern for the particular as opposed to the universal helped to shape his concept of “uselessness” in On Creative Imitation of Beauty. From this double perspective, we recognize Moritz’s growing regard for case narrative as an end in itself, independent from plans for a future science of empirical psychology. Moritz’s passionate and compassionate approach to observership helps to revise Foucault’s “medical gaze.” This essay proposes that Moritz was a Wordsworthian figure in medical history, who injected psychiatric writing with the experience of ordinary life expressed in the simple language of non-experts.

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Introduction: Medical Case Histories as Genre: New Approaches

2014, Class, Monika

This article outlines a number of new approaches in the history of medicine and medical humanities to the study of medical case histories from a genre-theoretical vantage point. Differentiating between morphological and structuralist concepts of genre, the essay proposes the investigation of similarities and differences among specific series of case histories in order to recover evolving, changing, or decaying patterns and practices in texts and communicative acts about human health during different historical epochs, including antiquity, Renaissance, Enlightenment, Romantic and Victorian age. The article highlights the importance of narrative, and thinking in cases, supports the notion of “epistemic genres” and pays special attention to the distinction between example and exemplar. It discerns three interrelated functions of case histories: propaedeutic, instantiative, and singular. The study of case histories as genre helps to overcome disjunctions in the history of literature and medicine and enhances multidisciplinary research.