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Impact of childhood trauma on positive and negative symptom remission in first episode psychosis

Impact of childhood trauma on positive and negative symptom remission in first episode psychosis

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PRUESSNER, Marita, Suzanne KING, Franz VERU, Inga SCHALINSKI, Nadia VRACOTAS, Sherezad ABADI, Gerald JORDAN, Martin LEPAGE, Srividya IYER, Ashok K. MALLA, 2021. Impact of childhood trauma on positive and negative symptom remission in first episode psychosis. In: Schizophrenia Research. Elsevier. 231, pp. 82-89. ISSN 0920-9964. eISSN 1573-2509. Available under: doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2021.02.023

@article{Pruessner2021-03-31Impac-53343, title={Impact of childhood trauma on positive and negative symptom remission in first episode psychosis}, year={2021}, doi={10.1016/j.schres.2021.02.023}, volume={231}, issn={0920-9964}, journal={Schizophrenia Research}, pages={82--89}, author={Pruessner, Marita and King, Suzanne and Veru, Franz and Schalinski, Inga and Vracotas, Nadia and Abadi, Sherezad and Jordan, Gerald and Lepage, Martin and Iyer, Srividya and Malla, Ashok K.} }

Pruessner, Marita Impact of childhood trauma on positive and negative symptom remission in first episode psychosis Veru, Franz terms-of-use Lepage, Martin Iyer, Srividya Objective<br />Early life adversity is suspected to play an important role for onset and course of psychosis, but its relationship with longer-term clinical outcome is not entirely clear. In this longitudinal study, we investigated the impact of childhood trauma (CT) on positive and negative symptom remission in first episode psychosis (FEP) patients over two years.<br /><br />Methods<br />A total of 210 FEP patients were assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Patients reporting moderate to severe trauma (CT; N = 114; 54.3%) were compared to those without trauma (N-CT; N = 96; 45.7%). Positive (PSR) and negative symptom remission (NSR) were determined monthly over 24 months following established criteria using the Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms and the Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms. Global Functioning was evaluated at baseline and 24 months of follow-up.<br /><br />Results<br />Compared to N-CT patients, CT patients had achieved significantly lower rates of PSR at 12 months and significantly lower rates of NSR at 24 months. A dose-response relationship was observed between the number of trauma categories fulfilled and the number of patients not achieving PSR and NSR at these time points. Higher trauma scores were significantly associated with poor functioning and higher positive and negative symptom severity at 24 months, but not at baseline and 12 months of follow-up.<br /><br />Conclusion<br />Differential effects of CT on clinical outcome may not be apparent at psychosis onset, but only become evident through poor symptomatic remission and general functioning over time. Targeted diagnostic and therapeutic efforts after illness onset might limit these detrimental consequences. Schalinski, Inga Pruessner, Marita Iyer, Srividya 2021-04-08T09:39:23Z Lepage, Martin 2021-03-31 Vracotas, Nadia King, Suzanne Malla, Ashok K. Vracotas, Nadia Veru, Franz Abadi, Sherezad Malla, Ashok K. King, Suzanne Jordan, Gerald Jordan, Gerald Schalinski, Inga Abadi, Sherezad 2021-04-08T09:39:23Z eng

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