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Patterns of pollen dispersal and mating in a population of the clonal plant Sagittaria latifolia

Patterns of pollen dispersal and mating in a population of the clonal plant Sagittaria latifolia

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STEPHENS, Samantha, Mark VAN KLEUNEN, Marcel E. DORKEN, 2020. Patterns of pollen dispersal and mating in a population of the clonal plant Sagittaria latifolia. In: Journal of Ecology. Wiley. ISSN 0022-0477. eISSN 1365-2745. Available under: doi: 10.1111/1365-2745.13399

@article{Stephens2020-05-07Patte-49463, title={Patterns of pollen dispersal and mating in a population of the clonal plant Sagittaria latifolia}, year={2020}, doi={10.1111/1365-2745.13399}, issn={0022-0477}, journal={Journal of Ecology}, author={Stephens, Samantha and van Kleunen, Mark and Dorken, Marcel E.} }

2020-05-11T13:05:41Z Patterns of pollen dispersal and mating in a population of the clonal plant Sagittaria latifolia van Kleunen, Mark terms-of-use van Kleunen, Mark eng Dorken, Marcel E. Dorken, Marcel E. 1. Increased plant size is generally expected to have negative consequences for mating by increasing pollen transfer between flowers of the same plant. Such geitonogamous self-pollination would then reduce sexual fitness through both female and male function. However, recent theoretical work has indicated that when plants grow clonally, the outward expansion of plants caused by clonal growth might have positive effects on siring without substantially increasing rates of self-pollination.<br />2. We investigated patterns of pollen dispersal, selfing and siring in a monoecious population of the clonal plant Sagittaria latifolia, in which clones varied in size and the extent of intermingling with other clones. A spatially explicit statistical model based on the inferred pollen dispersal kernel was constructed to examine the mechanisms underlying observed mating patterns.<br />3. Pollen dispersal typically occurred over distances that exceeded the spatial extent of clones. There was a positive association between clone size (measured as the number of ramets per genet) and the likelihood that clones were intermingled with the shoots of other clones. Together, these patterns of pollen dispersal and clonal intermingling resulted in a weak positive association between clone size and selfing rates and a strong positive association between clone size and outcross siring success. These patterns were replicated in the spatially explicit model, indicating that the intermingling of clones is an important determinant of mating patterns in this population.<br />4. Synthesis. Our study provides the first examination of the pollen dispersal kernel for a clonal plant. It is the first study providing empirical support for model predictions that potentially negative effects of increased selfing in large clones might be offset by increased siring success. This implies that the negative consequences of becoming large do not necessarily apply to clonal plants. Stephens, Samantha 2020-05-11T13:05:41Z Stephens, Samantha 2020-05-07

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