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On the calculation of lake metabolic rates: Diel O<sub>2</sub> and <sup>18/16</sup>O technique

On the calculation of lake metabolic rates: Diel O2 and 18/16O technique

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PEETERS, Frank, Hilmar HOFMANN, Jorge Encinas FERNÁNDEZ, 2019. On the calculation of lake metabolic rates: Diel O2 and 18/16O technique. In: Water Research. 165, pp. 114990. ISSN 0043-1354. eISSN 1879-2448. Available under: doi: 10.1016/j.watres.2019.114990

@article{Peeters2019-11calcu-46702, title={On the calculation of lake metabolic rates: Diel O2 and 18/16O technique}, year={2019}, doi={10.1016/j.watres.2019.114990}, volume={165}, issn={0043-1354}, journal={Water Research}, author={Peeters, Frank and Hofmann, Hilmar and Fernández, Jorge Encinas}, note={Article Number: 114990} }

On the calculation of lake metabolic rates: Diel O<sub>2</sub> and <sup>18/16</sup>O technique Metabolic transformations have a major impact on the development of primary producers in aquatic systems and thus affect the dynamics of the entire aquatic food web. Furthermore, metabolic transformations contribute to the carbon budget and thereby influence CO<sub>2</sub> emissions from aquatic systems. Several techniques have been developed that aim at an easy assessment of metabolic rates over long time periods or in many systems. The <sup>18/16</sup>O technique, which utilizes the isotopic fractionation between <sup>18</sup>O and <sup>16</sup>O isotopes due to metabolic transformations, is receiving increasing popularity in studies comparing the metabolism in many different lakes and served as basis for the conclusions that production increases with increasing atmospheric CO<sub>2 </sub>and that surprisingly little terrestrial carbon is recycled in lakes of the arid circumpolar landscape. However, we demonstrate here that the steady state assumptions underlying the <sup>18/16</sup>O technique cause large uncertainties in the estimated metabolic rates. This conclusion is based on a sensitivity analysis using a numerical model of dissolved oxygen, DO, and of dissolved <sup>18</sup>O, <sup>18</sup>O<sub>DO</sub>, but is also confirmed by published metabolic rates estimated from the <sup>18/16</sup>O and the diel O<sub>2</sub> techniques. Metabolic rates obtained from the <sup>18/16</sup>O technique appear unsuited for correlation analyses between lakes but may provide reasonable estimates in systems with low and long-term stable production. In addition we illustrate that the combination of few <sup>18</sup>O measurements with the diel O<sub>2</sub> technique and an inverse fitting procedure can improve estimates of metabolic rates and in particular of respiration rates. Hofmann, Hilmar Fernández, Jorge Encinas Fernández, Jorge Encinas Hofmann, Hilmar Peeters, Frank eng 2019-11 2019-08-20T14:16:32Z 2019-08-20T14:16:32Z Peeters, Frank

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