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Grandmaternal stress during pregnancy and DNA methylation of the third Generation : an epigenome-wide association study

Grandmaternal stress during pregnancy and DNA methylation of the third Generation : an epigenome-wide association study

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SERPELONI, Fernanda, Karl RADTKE, Simone Gonçalves de ASSIS, Frederico HENNING, Daniel NÄTT, Thomas ELBERT, 2017. Grandmaternal stress during pregnancy and DNA methylation of the third Generation : an epigenome-wide association study. In: Translational Psychiatry. 7, e1202. eISSN 2158-3188

@article{Serpeloni2017-08-15Grand-40020, title={Grandmaternal stress during pregnancy and DNA methylation of the third Generation : an epigenome-wide association study}, year={2017}, doi={10.1038/tp.2017.153}, volume={7}, journal={Translational Psychiatry}, author={Serpeloni, Fernanda and Radtke, Karl and Assis, Simone Gonçalves de and Henning, Frederico and Nätt, Daniel and Elbert, Thomas}, note={Article Number: e1202} }

Grandmaternal stress during pregnancy and DNA methylation of the third Generation : an epigenome-wide association study Serpeloni, Fernanda Stress during pregnancy may impact subsequent generations, which is demonstrated by an increased susceptibility to childhood and adulthood health problems in the children and grandchildren. Although the importance of the prenatal environment is well reported with regards to future physical and emotional outcomes, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that mediate the long-term consequences of early stress across generations. Recent studies have identified DNA methylation as a possible mediator of the impact of prenatal stress in the offspring. Whether psychosocial stress during pregnancy also affects DNA methylation of the grandchildren is still not known. In the present study we examined the multigenerational hypothesis, that is, grandmaternal exposure to psychosocial stress during pregnancy affecting DNA methylation of the grandchildren. We determined the genome-wide DNA methylation profile in 121 children (65 females and 56 males) and tested for associations with exposure to grandmaternal interpersonal violence during pregnancy. We observed methylation variations of five CpG sites significantly (FDR<0.05) associated with the grandmother's report of exposure to violence while pregnant with the mothers of the children. The results revealed differential methylation of genes previously shown to be involved in circulatory system processes (FDR<0.05). This study provides support for DNA methylation as a biological mechanism involved in the transmission of stress across generations and motivates further investigations to examine prenatal-dependent DNA methylation as a potential biomarker for health problems. Serpeloni, Fernanda 2017-09-08T08:53:11Z Henning, Frederico Elbert, Thomas Nätt, Daniel Assis, Simone Gonçalves de eng 2017-09-08T08:53:11Z Assis, Simone Gonçalves de 2017-08-15 Elbert, Thomas Nätt, Daniel Henning, Frederico Radtke, Karl Radtke, Karl

Dateiabrufe seit 08.09.2017 (Informationen über die Zugriffsstatistik)

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